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Thunder Fighter

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Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
« on: September 11, 2016, 03:54:45 AM »

With a big thanks to Dunkan Bossion I managed to get hold of one of the new Soxos DB7 from Heli Professionals in Switzerland for the purpose of putting together this detailed build thread. The kit is an early production run and is complete except that it doesn’t have the final canopy paint scheme that has been selected for the release but it is the new design/shape as released at IRCHA. (I am posting this in one of the main forums as there isn't a Heli Professionals/soxos area setup yet)

Setup:
Scorpion HK5025-440kv 18t pinion
YGE-160
Atom 12s 5000mah 65c
BK7001 swash and Futaba BLS 276 tail
Brain v1 running V2 firmware
Jeti R3 Rx
2200mah 2s Rx pack
Rail 716mm main's and KBDD extreme 112mm tails

On opening the box you are presented with some very nicely machined and anodised parts on in a display tray on top of a box containing the majority of the other parts. The canopy takes up the other side of the box with the boom and longer parts on the bottom.



The Canopy in the kit is in the new shape developed for the DB7 with a nice sleek shape and plenty of cooling. The scheme is one of the prototypes made during the development of the final canopy so is slightly different to the DB7 release but has the same overall colours, which I think are going to make the heli very visible in the sky.





The manual included is in both German and English and the layout is easy to read with a step numbers, part diagram, description and number of items so you can check all the parts as you open each bag. The bolt pictures are true life size so you can compare the bolts to the diagrams to make sure you are using the right parts. The parts are packaged in numbered bags that match the steps in the manual, with all of the parts for that step included (except for the components in the parts tray shown above and the boom pieces).



The Main frames are well finished and I didn’t feel the need to file or sand the edges as there were no burrs or very sharp surfaces. Looking at the material it appears to be full carbon fibre, not a fibreglass carbon mix, nice and stiff.



The battery tray holders are the first parts to be fitted and they also make up the frame spaces for the stacked type frame. I do like this design as you don’t have to hold or insert spacers while putting the upper and lower parts of the frame together.



The screws into the plastic are also well thought out, they are self tapping screws with proper Hex heads. Many other heli’s use standard machine type bolts which are easier to strip out the plastic or others use self tapping screws with Philips type heads, which are less robust on the head. The screws bite in nicely but you still should be careful not to over tighten, and of course no Loctite is required when screwing into plastic.

The front canopy mount balls are also mounted now.



The landing gear are fitted next, pay attention to make sure everything is nice a square when tightening up the skids. The photo shows before I put the ends on the skids, they are glued in with superglue and are a nice easy fit, they don’t need to be forced in like others I have built and the glue should hold them well. The kit includes skid rubbers, or skid nuts as they are sometimes called that are excellent if operating from a smooth surface like concrete but the majority of my flying is from grass strips so I have not fitted them.



Now it is time to get to the beautifully machined main frame alloy cage. This holds all of the major components and is incredibly stiff and also very light. I weighed my at 181g bare. There has been some concern about this part being damaged in a crash but talking to Dunkan Bossion and the factory the cage has been very resilient and survives crashes up to and beyond where you would require a full re-kit. I believe the only one damaged by the team so far was after a blade-stop auto that wasn’t recovered.



The pinion gear for the torque tube is held by 2 bearings in a plastic clamshell. In general I have found the plastic to be free from molding flashing needing very little or no cleaning up, but it is worth checking the two faces that match up here (the sides facing the camera) to make sure they will sit flat together when they are clamped into the frame.



When attaching the torque tube pinion to the frame pay attention not to over tighten as mentioned in the manual. Also as with any part like this you need to tighten the part evenly to keep everything square. The best way to do this is to screw all of the screws into place but not tightened up at all, then work your way around the bolts in a crisscross fashion tightening each bolt a little at a time until the desired tension is achieved. This applies to many other components in the build so make sure you take the time to properly tighten parts and always loctite the bolts except where a locknut is used or where they screw into plastic.



The main gear and oneway need to be assembled, pay attention to the side the sleeve inserts into the gear, mine had the oneway inserted on the wrong side in the package, but it wasn’t bolted together just sitting that way so just check the manual to be sure before you put the screws in.



The bottom bearing is inserted into the frame. I have not felt the need to use bearing retainer for any of the bearings as they are an excellent fit. They go solidly into place and are not so tight as to require heat to fit but are as tight as you can get without it. Follow the described directions in the manual around order of inserting the maingear/oneway assembly followed but the bevel gear at the base. Note the frame is not symmetrical and the other side of the frame (from the picture) is raised to allow easier insertion of the gears. You can then insert the main shaft and put the bolt into the bevel gear.

The spacer is slipped on top and the top bearing inserted. Tighten up the screws on the top bearing then feel for any axial play in the mainshaft, there are several 0.1mm and 0.2mm shims supplied that can be inserted to remove any movement. My setup did not require any shims but over time shims may need to be added.

I did notice the bevel gear to the TT pinion was a tight mesh with no backlash, but this is by design and will wear-in after a few flights. I plan to leave these gears un-lubricated for the initial flights to let them wear in then put some dry-fluid or similar lube on them.



The design includes a bearing under the bevel gear to limit any distortion in the bevel gear causing the gears to be damaged. The bearing should not touch the bottom of the bevel gear, it should sit off by 0.1mm.



For most of us it is hard to tell how much 0.1mm gap should be, so you can use this little trick. Take one of the mainshaft 0.1mm shims and use it like a spacer or feeler gauge. I have mine set so at the tightest point it is 0.1mm from the gear.



The intermediate gears are bolted together and slid into place. Getting the gears in there was a little difficult as the bottom of the plastic gear is a little lower than the bearing, it does go in there, a little perseverance is required. You could trim the bottom of the gear a little if it proves too difficult to get in there. Remember to use some bearing retainer on the sleeves that carry the shaft which slots in the bottom and is screwed in at the top.



The rear canopy mounts are added now, the cup at the end that the canopy call clips into is a sacrificial part designed to break in a crash, so need to be mounted with a little care. You should only hand tighten it onto the end of the long mount. A spare set is included in the box so if you do manage to break one you can replace it and be off an flying quickly.

I threaded the grub screw through the frame so the head is on the inside. That allowed me to hold the grubs screw with a standard allen key while tightening the metal mount, then just screw the cup on the end.



The frame halves are now bolted together with 3 long screws each side, as mentioned before this is an easy task as the spacers are molded in as part of the battery tray system.



The DB edition has gone away from the box concept used on the other model for mounting the components and moved to a more standard carbon mount. There is plenty of room up front for an ESC and also under the tray for a BEC or Rx pack and any telemetry units.



The lower plate slides into the battery tray mounts before bolting into the frames. There is a set order to how the bolts are done up when mounting the tray to stop any distortion. Holes for straps are provided on both mounting plates to aid in holding down the equipment.



The battery tray clip/latch is at the front of the model and I added a little synthetic grease to the slider as I put it together just to keep it moving smoothly.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 06:40:32 PM by Thunder Fighter »
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    SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
    Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
    SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
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    Thunder Fighter

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    Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
    « Reply #1 on: September 11, 2016, 03:59:45 AM »

    The servos are mounted next, you use spacers under the Pitch and aileron servos to make sure they do not touch in the middle of the frame. The manual recommends using servo grommets but on electric models I prefer to solidly mount the servos so I left them off. With the large spacer and one of the 2mm spacers my servos had a few mm gap between them.



    The Elevator servo may also need a spacer or two depending on its case dimensions, you need to space it out so the case does not hit the oneway sleeve or main gear. In my case 1 of the 2mm sleeves were used on each side of the servo.



    The Swash balls are added to the swash which is a low profile unit. It felt nice and tight with virtually no slop between the top and bottom plates and the ball rotated smoothly and had some vertical movement but this does not affect its flight performance as it is only the relation of the top and bottom plates, not the ball that effects control.



    The servo horns are not included in the DB7 edition allowing you to use your own choice of arms and also allowing for servos like the MKS X8’s or other non-Futaba standard spline servos to be fitted. The other Soxos kits come with adjustable arms, which clamp on to centres mounted on the splines making it possible to centre the servo arms without using any trim in the FBL. I may grab a set to try out on my DB7 at a later stage but for now will use standard arms.

    There are both M2 and M3 threaded balls supplied for the servo arms which is a nice touch so you can pick the right ones depending on the arms you use

    The links from the servo to the swash are done up till the plastic bottoms out on the centre of the link. I screwed them all together, then measured the length of each. Taking the longest one I adjusted it so the ends pointed in the the correct direction for one location then unscrewed the other links until they matched the long link. In this way you can get all three links to be very close to the same length. The links must be put on the balls with the numbers facing the ball. The balls are well sized and didn't need any reaming but were still tight on the balls with no slop.



    After fitting the swash and links I found the servo geometry was a little out with my servos as the balls were too close to the frame causing the pitch and elevator servo links to not be vertical. It was an easy matter to put an extra 2mm shim under each of the servos to space them out a little more and get nice vertical links. The elevator servo ball is perfectly centered so I did not need to make any changes with that.

    Looking at the servo arms from the other Soxos kits they have the ability to move in and out to get the links vertical before you clamp them so mounting the servos close together in the frame will be optimum but with different servos in the DB7 you may need to try a few spacer setups to get everything setup correctly. One nice point is that the servos and mounts are very easy to access, something that can be an issue on other models, so you can quickly try the different spacings.

    After the change you can see the larger gap between the servos and the links are vertical even though the perspective of this picture makes it look like they are on an angle.



    The DB7 also features an additional mount for your Rx or other equipment above the servos.



    The motor is next up. The design of the Soxos allows for large can motors like the HK5025 I will be using. The motor mount and support are identical parts, you can see the mount on the motor with the support beside it. Some nice features here are the very large bearings on the top and bottom of the pinion so the motor shaft is fully supported and will mean the motor bearing will last a very long time. The mount is also slotted where it mates with the motor allowing better airflow and increasing surface area for cooling.



    The pinion has 2 grubs screws but only the one closer to the motor is required. I have a long shaft on my motor so will make use of the second grub screw anyway. Before grinding flats shaft make sure the motor is protected from any metal fillings. One of the bags from the build with a small cut in the corner works well.



    A dremel with a grinding wheel or disk works well to make the flats. They don’t need to be very large, just enough to allow the pinion to bite on the shaft.



    This photo shows how the pinion and support mounts in the heli.



    Mounted in the heli. The gear mesh should be setup so the tightest point has a very small amount of backlash.



    The DB7 has a new large head with axle pivot. The dampers are 2 piece with a delrin centre that fits inside a rubber boot. Grease the dampers and feathering shaft as you assemble them.



    The blade grips are also new for the DB7 and are very substantial and nicely machined and anodised. Apply grease to the thrust bearings, paying attention to the inside and outside washers which are labeled. The final washer is also directional with the small radius pointing outwards against the bearing.



    There are no spacers between the dampers and the grips as the hard part of the damper rests against the bearing. The screws for the feathering shaft were threaded into the feathering shaft and the whole assembly was well oiled. It is very important to remove the oil from both the bolts and the threads to make sure the loctite can do its job on these important screws.



    The follower arm is single sided and mounts to the centre of the head block. Pay attention to orientation of the ball link when attaching it to the swash, the numbered side goes towards the ball.



    The head links in production are going to be turnbuckles allowing the tracking to be set very accurately, this early release kit came with standard links.

    « Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 07:26:14 PM by Thunder Fighter »
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      SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
      Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
      SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
      CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
      MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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      Thunder Fighter

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      Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
      « Reply #2 on: September 11, 2016, 04:00:27 AM »

      Time to start on the tail. The boom is pre-drilled with a single hole at the front and 4 holes with an alloy insert that is threaded for the tail box. This is the tail end of the boom.



      The torque tube is interesting in the way the whole length of the tube is knurled to fit into the drive gears. This means no torque tube ends need to be fitted and this removes a potential failure point and also helps the torque tube to be very stiff. The bearings are already glued to the torque tube in the correct locations.



      The soft rubber boots are slipped over the bearings, do not apply grease to the inside of the boot, wait until you have mounted them, then apply a little rubber safe grease to the outside of the boot where it will slide into the boom.



      In addition to the grease I apply a little silicon spray to the inside of the boom, to aid sliding the torque tube in. Pay attention to orientation as the torque tube, it is inserted from the front of the boom (as there is a sleeve in the tail end) and the bearing spacing with the shorter end is inserted first.

      Here is a closeup of the end that goes into the mainframe showing the single hole and you can see the shape of the Torque tube in this shot.



      The tail case has two O-rings inserted into it before it is slid onto the boom, this gives some damping to the tail box. I did not grease these as they slipped on easily but if you do use grease here, make sure you clean up the grease before inserting the 4 screws to hold it so the loctite can work. The 4 screws have rubber inserts on them, it is also worth cleaning the threads before applying the loctite to the screws as there may be some grease there from when the rubber boots were fitted.



      Pay attention to the orientation of the tail box as you attach it. The side that mounts the tail fin (facing the camera) is the same side as the hole in the front of the boom, and is also facing the camera but out of shot.



      The tail gears are a smaller module than the front gears and designed as an easy to replace failure point in the case of a tail strike or crash. Checking for molding flash between the cases is again recommended here.



      The gear slides into the tail box and is located by two lugs.



      Both sides of the tail box are the same, but the bearing is inserted into them from opposite sides. You need to pay attention to have the flange of the bearing facing inside, but also you need to pay attention to how the bearings protrude into the box. The bearing flange that protrudes more from the plate goes on the right side (tail blade side) of the tailbox. The bearing flange that is recessed more into the plate is fitted to the left side (tail fin side) of the tailbox. If you try assemble with the sides swapped you will see quickly that you can’t fit the second side plate or the tail gear can move out of mesh.



      The tails shaft has the final gear molded on as a single part, when removing it from the bag note there is a shim washer sitting on the tail shaft, it can be easy to miss it and possibly loose it as take it out of the bag, so pay attention to it as you remove it from the packaging.



      The tail servo drive is a rotating rod rather than a push pull mechanism that should lead to very low slop and accurate control as there are very few moving parts. An alloy insert is already mounted in the tail rod and the plastic arm locates into it and a bolt screws into it. This is the tail end and the hole mounts directly to the tail slider ball.



      The tail rod is supported in 3 places along the boom with ball raced clamps.



      The rod is glued into the tail end support bearing with a small amount of CA glue. Make sure not to get any into the bearing.



      The servo is mounted in a very different orientation to other heli’s. I did use the servo grommets and bushes when mounting the tail servo.



      When you mount the servo pay attention to the orientation if you want the nice detail of the soxos lettering visible from above. The servo spline adapter can be screwed to the servo at this stage but the clap that holds the tail rod can be left loose till the boom is mounted and all of the clamps are straightened out and set at the right place on the boom. This needs to be done when the boom supports are attached to the heli in a later step.



      The plastic split insert is pushed into the frame and needs to be lined up with the hole for the boom pin screw. The boom is then inserted and the 3 holes need to lined up so you can pin the boom with the supplied screw.



      The tail is assembled and greased and loctited as delivered. I did pull one screw just to check the loctite and there was ample on the screw. You can see the “Chinese weights” are part of the on grips to reduce the torque required to move the tail when spinning.



      The boom braces are already glued so it is just a matter of bolting them on. It was notable that no slow cure (epoxy) glue was required in the build, with neither the tail rod or the boom braces requiring it.



      The pitch slider is also assembled and ready to fit. It was nice to see the links moved freely in their slots on the slider.



      The tail assembled and ready for blades. You can align and tighten the tail rod supports and tail servo clamp now.



      After centring the tail servo you can tighten the clamp on the tail rod. I think it is worth adding some green or red loctite to this clap as it is a vital part, you don’t want it slipping and applying some retaining loctite will give some extra security.

      « Last Edit: September 13, 2016, 05:00:29 AM by Thunder Fighter »
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        SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
        Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
        SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
        CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
        MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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        Thunder Fighter

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        Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
        « Reply #3 on: September 11, 2016, 04:00:40 AM »

        Finishing off the electronics install, there is plenty of room to mount components. Up front I have a YGE 160A with a telemetry sensor inline and a 2200mah Rx pack under the ESC tray. The kit is very complete including Velcro straps for holding the Rx pack and ESC on the trays and tie straps to secure the wiring.



        The leads for the ESC and telemetry are run down the underside of the frame using the included tie straps, some velcro and 3M grey double sided tape. You can also see the Perfect Regulators Safe switch on this side of the heli.



        The other side has the main telemetry unit and you might notice that there is a hole without a screw at the front of the frame. This hole is not used with the DB7 setup.



        The FBL can be mounted in several positions but the metal boom area is probably the best option. If you are running a FBL that has a remote sensor then the sensor unit could be mounted here and the main unit on the tray. In the photo I have not secured the plugs in the FBL or Rx but will be putting hot glue on them to make sure they do no pull or wiggle out.



        The battery tray includes velcro and straps, and one tray is included in the kit. Additional trays also come with the Velco and straps and fit the range of soxos heli’s including the new 550. A blade holder is also included in the kit.

        The area for the packs is very large and the packs are kept within the frames rather than sticking out the front of the heli, so offers good protection for the packs.



        After completing the setup I ran the heli up on the bench without blades. I did notice some vibration on the heli that is caused by the tight mesh of the front Bevel gear. To help it bed in I did not lubricate any of the gears and ran a pack through the heli without blades and found the vibrations were reduced at the end of the pack. I then lubricated both the back and front TT gears (as well as the main drive gears) before the maiden. The bevel gear is designed to bed in over the first 5 or so flights so you can expect any remaining vibration to disappear after it is worn in.

        Ready for the maiden flight.







        First liftoff was uneventful with the stock gains on the Brain FBL. The heli has a nose down stance with the main shaft titled forward a few degrees giving it an aggressive look. With the Rail 716mm main blades the heli has a very light disc loading and with my head speeds at 1600/1900/2050rpm you can do some nice low head speed smooth flying at 1600rpm and at 1900rpm the heli has plenty of pop. At 2050 the heli moves very fast and feels very nimble I would guess helped by the high centre of gravity and low head. There were no issues with head bobble with this range of head speeds meaning the 2 piece dampers are doing a good job, even before they bed in.

        As mentioned the heli is relatively light weight. My RTF weight with a large motor, Rx pack, long blades and heavy 65C 5000mah packs (840g each) comes in at 5.5kg. You can save 66g with a 4525 Ultimate motor and another 160g with some pulse 4500mah 45C packs. This will get you down 5.25kg without any real compromise in performance for most pilots.

        The auto performance is excellent with the efficient drive train giving a lot of hang time at the bottom of autos even before the gears are fully bedded in.

        The heli is designed with performance in mind and I can see why it is having good success in competition in the hands of the team pilots. I think this is going to be a very versatile machine with its light weight giving good performance and a bit of float on larger blades (710-720mm) and being more locked in for hard 3d stops on smaller 685-700mm blades.

        Finally some flight photos.















        //Dennis.
        « Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 04:07:12 AM by Thunder Fighter »
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          SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
          Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
          SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
          CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
          MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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          Thunder Fighter

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          Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
          « Reply #4 on: September 11, 2016, 07:53:35 PM »

          Post 2 updated with part 2 of the build.

          //Dennis.
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            SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
            Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
            SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
            CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
            MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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            Ben

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            Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
            « Reply #5 on: September 11, 2016, 08:22:13 PM »

            So who's selling Soxos in Australia?
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              Thunder Fighter

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              Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
              « Reply #6 on: September 11, 2016, 08:38:44 PM »

              Quote from: Ben;1619585
              So who's selling Soxos in Australia?

              Have a look at Soxos Austraila on Facebook.

              //Dennis.
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                SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
                Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
                SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
                CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
                MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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                Ben

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                Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                « Reply #7 on: September 11, 2016, 08:55:11 PM »

                Yeah I noticed and liked their page a couple of days ago - though not much detail, website goes to a place holder.

                Ah - just read some of the comment. Good work guys.
                « Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 09:02:57 PM by Ben »
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                  Thunder Fighter

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                  Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                  « Reply #8 on: September 13, 2016, 05:02:30 AM »

                  Post number 3 updated with the boom and tail build.

                  //Dennis.
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                    SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
                    Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
                    SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
                    CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
                    MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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                    Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                    « Reply #9 on: September 14, 2016, 04:28:41 AM »

                    Post number 4 updated with the final build pictures and maiden flight report.

                    Here are some additional photos from the field.













                    //Dennis.
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                      SOXOS DB7 : SOXOS 600 : SOXOS 550 : SOXOS F3C
                      Protos 380 Evo : MSH Mini Protos FBL - stretch
                      SAB Goblin 700 Nightflyer : Logo 600 Buddybox trainer
                      CYE Stingray collective quad : and a handful of Blade Micros
                      MAAA Instructor Blades : Jeti DS-16
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                      Ozzy Mozzy

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                      Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                      « Reply #10 on: September 14, 2016, 10:23:33 AM »

                      So........ A lot lighter than a KDS Agile 7.2 lol
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                        Thunder Fighter

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                        Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                        « Reply #11 on: September 14, 2016, 05:38:16 PM »

                        Quote from: Ozzy Mozzy;1619613
                        So........ A lot lighter than a KDS Agile 7.2 lol
                        It's hard to do a direct comparisson at this early stage but I would guess it is similar to the new Logo700 with the same equipment.

                        //Dennis.

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                          Ozzy Mozzy

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                          Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                          « Reply #12 on: September 14, 2016, 05:54:10 PM »

                          Yeah I checked the weight that Hamish posted on his Logo 700 and checked it with what you posted on this DB7. It's close enough to be comparable....

                          The poor Agile is just heavy!!!
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                            Shape S8, Banshee #23, TDF, Chronos, Logo 700, Trex 600@Night, VBC www.largescaledownunder.com.au

                            MickyD

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                            Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                            « Reply #13 on: September 14, 2016, 08:14:47 PM »

                            Quote from: Ozzy Mozzy;1619618

                            The poor Agile is just heavy!!!

                            Doesn't matter. Pilot Kan Poonnoi came 3rd with this heli @ global 3d 2016. It moves well.
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                              Ozzy Mozzy

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                              Soxos DB7 detailed build thread
                              « Reply #14 on: September 14, 2016, 08:23:41 PM »

                              That's right he did too.... :metal:

                              I like having a heavy Heli, it's solid in the air and high winds dont really bother it..... I was actually thinking of going a little higher in head speed today, my highest is 1900 at the moment....

                              And on the other side I have found the joys of a light heli, first the Logo 600 and now the Synergy e5 stretched to a 700..... :grin:

                              Damn I love this hobby!!! so much variety........ :rockon:
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